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Active Surveillance

Active surveillance in men with Gleason 3 + 4 = 7 prostate cancer at diagnosis

May 20, 2018

A critical question for men with favorable intermediate-risk prostate cancer (based primarily on a Gleason score of 3 + 4 = 7) can often be, “How safe would it be for me to go on active surveillance for a while after initial diagnosis?” Read the article here.

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When can active surveillance be less active?

April 2, 2018

A substantial proportion of men with low-risk prostate cancer can safely be followed with a de-intensified active surveillance protocol. Read the article here.

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Active Surveillance

September 3, 2017

Predicting outcomes on active surveillance for intermediate-risk patients Read the article here. Active Surveillance for Intermediate-risk Prostate Cancer Challenged Read the article here. Active Surveillance versus Watchful Waiting Read the article here. Surgery isn’t necessarily best for prostate cancer, according to study led by Minneapolis VA Read the article here.

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Video: Active Surveillance: Protecting Patients from Harm – Dr. Laurence Klotz

August 2, 2017

From a conference in May 2017, a comprehensive overview of active surveillance by one of the experts in the field. View video.

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Active Surveillance in Men under 60

July 2, 2017

Younger age at diagnosis of low-risk prostate cancer was independently associated with decreased risk of disease progression in men managed with active surveillance, researchers reported. Read the article here. Active surveillance is a reasonable option for carefully selected men under 60 with low-risk prostate cancer. However, patients must be surveyed closely and understand the significant […]

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15-year metastasis-free survival in men on active surveillance in The Netherlands

May 7, 2017

According to new data reported at the annual meeting of the European Association of Urology in London, active surveillance of men diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer was not associated with an elevated risk for metastatic disease at 15 years of follow-up. Read the article here.

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What influences opting out of active surveillance?

April 9, 2017

A man’s race/ethnicity might influence decision-making regarding opting for active treatment as well as undergoing serial biopsies during active surveillance, according to a recent study. Read the article here.

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Prostate Cancer: New Directions With Active Surveillance

January 2, 2017

Howard Wolinsky, a journalist based in the Chicago area, was diagnosed with early prostate cancer in 2010. After over 5 years of active surveillance, he describes his continuing quest to make the best — and most informed — decision about his care. Read the article here.

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Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System score of four or more: active surveillance no more

January 2, 2017

The introduction of multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) has improved the diagnosis and risk stratification of intermediate and high-risk prostate cancer. In addition to diagnosis, mpMRI has increasingly become a useful tool for monitoring the prostate cancer risk of patients on active surveillance (AS) programmes. Long-term data indicates that there is no oncological benefit for AS programmes […]

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Preventing Overtreatment of Prostate Cancer: New Model Identifies Ideal Patients for Active Surveillance

October 23, 2016

A new care model for patients with low-risk prostate cancer may help prevent disease overtreatment. This evidence-based approach uses best practices to select patients to avoid disease overtreatment. Results from a 3-year study recently published in Urology indicate that active surveillance (AS) rates nearly doubled after this model was adopted. Read the article here.

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